Suicide

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If you are thinking about suicide, please call us anytime of any day or night, before you put any thoughts into action.  Pick up your telephone and dial

(765) 742-0244

 

or toll free for White County (877) 491-1632

     or call 1-800-SUICIDE to reach help nearest you.

If you are visiting this site, there is a part of you who is still trying to find a way to live.  Please call one of our caring volunteers now.  Someone is there 24 hours a day to listen to you.  We know you are in pain.  Please call.

If you are not ready to talk yet, please visit one of the links below for more information.

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Suicide Prevention

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Survivors of Suicide Support Group

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Media Guidelines

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Other Links

Lafayette Crisis Center says: You Can Prevent Suicide

Once every minute of every day, someone in the United States attempts suicide. According to official statistics, nearly 30,000 people take their own lives each year. Suicide victims come from all walks of life, from all kinds of economic and educational backgrounds. Suicide is a tragedy for the victim as well as the family and friends left behind. If you suspect one of your loved ones or friends is contemplating suicide, you can help best by following these guidelines offered by the American Association of Suicidology and the Lafayette Crisis Center.

bulletTAKE THREATS SERIOUSLY
If someone you know threatens suicide, listen. Four out of five people who commit suicide have tried it or threatened it previously. The old myth, "those who talk about it won't do it", is dangerously false. More than likely, by threatening suicide, the person is calling for help - trying to let you know how bad things are.
bulletWATCH FOR CLUES
Most people considering suicide give clues of their intent. Look for marked changes in personality, behavior, and appearance. Watch for signs of depression such as insomnia, loss of appetite, or continual exhaustion. Be alert when a person turns to destructive behavior patterns such as drug and alcohol abuse, especially when this behavior is unusual. A person feeling suicidal may start preparing for death. Making out a will, giving away beloved pets or valuable possessions, saving pills or buying a gun could indicate that a person is contemplating suicide.
bulletANSWER CRIES FOR HELP
Once you are alerted to these clues that may constitute a "cry for help" from a loved one or friend, you can help in several ways. The most important of these is not to ignore the issues. It is better to offer help early than to regret not doing so later. The first step is to offer support, understanding, and compassion, no matter what the problems may be. The suicidal person is truly hurting.
bulletCONFRONT THE PROBLEM
If you suspect that a person is suicidal, begin by asking questions such as, "Are you feeling depressed?", "Have you been thinking of hurting yourself?", leading up to the question, "Are you thinking of killing yourself?" Be direct. Don't be afraid to discuss suicide with the person. Getting him or her to talk about it is a positive step. Be a good listener and a good friend... don't make moral judgments, act shocked, or make light of the situation. Offering advice such as, "Be grateful for what you have...you're so much better off than most," may only deepen the sense of guilt the person probably already feels. Discussing suicide may help lead the person away from actually doing it by giving him or her the feeling that someone cares.
bulletTELL THEM THAT YOU CARE
Persons who attempt suicide most often feel alone, worthless, helpless, hopeless, and unloved. You can help by letting them know that they are not alone, that you are always there for them to talk to. Tell loved ones how much you care about them and offer your support and compassion. By assuring the person that some help is available, you are literally throwing them a lifeline. Remember, although a person may think he wants to die, he has an innate will to live, and is more likely hoping to be rescued. They may be more negative about life than positive about death.
bulletGET PROFESSIONAL HELP
The most useful thing you can do is to encourage the person who is considering suicide to get professional help. There are mental health clinics, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, family doctors, and members of the clergy who can help. And in our community, there are groups of people dedicated specifically to preventing suicide. Your ability to get professional guidance for the suicidal person may save his or her life.
bulletOFFER ALTERNATIVES
Don't leave the initiative up to a suicidal person. Instead provide him or her with a list of agencies in your area where he or she can go for help. These centers provide professional counseling to individuals and offer alternative ways to solve problems.
bulletONE LOCAL ALTERNATIVE
In Tippecanoe County, one alternative to give a person who is suicidal is the phone number for the Lafayette Crisis Center. You can call the Crisis Center yourself for more information. Sometimes, you may want help in determining if what you are seeing in your friend or loved one is suicidal behavior. Don't wait...call. The trained volunteers at the Crisis Center are there to listen and provide crisis intervention, referrals to other area services, and suicide prevention services. All calls are free, confidential, and available by phone or in person 24 hours a day.
 
Call the Crisis Center at (765) 742-0244 or
Toll Free (877) 419-1632
or the Teen Line at (765) 423-1872.

People can also walk in to the Crisis Center
and see someone in person at
1244 N. 15th St. in Lafayette.

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Survivors Of Suicide Support Group

If you have lost a loved one through suicide, there is a free support group for you sponsored by the Lafayette Crisis Center. The meetings are held from 7:00-9:00 p.m. on the third Monday of every month at St. Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing, 1508 Tippecanoe Street, Lafayette, IN (West Lounge). The group is a place to grieve and heal with people who are sensitive to your pain and hurt.

No need to make reservations… just show up. 

The Crisis Center has sponsored this group since 1990.

Special thanks to our friends at the hospital for their continued support.

The group chooses themes at the SOS meetings.

Call (765) 742-0244 for more information or email: jane@lafayettecrisiscenter.org

Other Links

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If you are thinking about suicide, read this first...

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Indiana Suicide Prevention Coalition 

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Suicide Prevention Resource Center

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American Association of Suicidology

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National Strategy for Suicide Prevention

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Suicide Prevention Action Network, USA

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American Foundation For Suicide Prevention

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John L. McIntosh, Ph.D.

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Suicide Prevention Council of St. Joseph and surrounding counties (Indiana)

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Living Works

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